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Wall Ball

Thank you!

The 2015 Wall Ball event was able to raise over 20% of our operating budget!

Artscope would like to thank everyone who helped make Wall Ball 2015 an enormous success. With your generosity, we raised a significant amount of our annual budget, allowing us to continue our mission to offer creative programs for St. Louis children.

Check back later for information about next years’ event!

 

Thank You to our 2015 Sponsors:

 


2015 Artists:

Kat Kissick

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Kat Kissick is an artist and illustrator currently working in ink, watercolor, wax pastels, acrylics, tissue paper, and wood. Kissick’s work features a range of whimsical subjects in brightly colored dream-states. She was born in rural Indiana and now lives in St. Louis, Missouri, where her work has been shown at Koken Art Factory, SoHa Studio and Gallery, and Hydraulic Studios.

Greta Myers

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Ultimately, I am intrigued by attraction. What does it mean to pair up, to couple? I am presently interested in contemporary means of self created romantic partnerships and to what length will individuals go to to create this bond. I scour various social media and online dating sources to find men interested in this search. I paint them.

The dualities of all things plague me. I’m not sure if I am empathetic or apathetic. Probably a direct link to the ramifications of said social media and online dating.

Gaucha Berlin

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Gaucha Berlin completed her training as a Graphic Artist at Lette-Verein in Berlin, Germany. Her work has been featured in numerous publications and she has exhibited extensively in Berlin. The German Art Magazine ARTLOUT selected her as one of only 22 international artists asked to contribute work for their 5th Anniversary Issue. She has created public work that ranges from restaurant chalkboards in South Africa to storefront window installations in Kreuzberg, the heart of Berlin.

Gaucha Berlin’s current work consists primarily of collage, transfer drawing, and graphite. Her work delicately intertwines age-old ephemera with her original photography. Each of the resulting works contain their own story. The words to her stories are her images. Gaucha Berlin pulls inspiration for these works from her everyday life and her journeys as a world traveler.

In 2010, she relocated to Cherokee Street in St Louis, MO where she immediately began her contribution to the local art scene. Her work was featured as the first solo exhibition at SOHA Gallery. She has shown her work at numerous venues in St Louis and continues to seek artistic challenges that reveal an undiscovered world to her.

Jenna Bauer

Jenna Bauer

 

Jenna Bauer is a multidisciplinary artist. Her practice consists of painting, printmaking, drawing, and social sculpture: developing not-for-profit arts organizations, teaching and creating opportunities for arts education.

Bauer has maintained studios in Hell’s Kitchen, the Hudson River Valley, and her home town: Saint Louis.

Steven Walden

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Steven’s style is a mish-mash of Pop Art and Fauvism, as he attempts to present pieces that are dynamic, bold, and tap into the viewer’s childlike awe and imagination where hero worship and vivid colors collide.

David Langley

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David Langley earned his Studio Art Degree at Lincoln University, Missouri, under the instruction of internationally recognized ceramicist Dr. James Tatum.  Langley’s work has been recognized on both national and international levels.  ADBUSTERS, Journal of the Mental Environment, featured a six-page spread (3 centerfolds) of his work in a post 9/11 issue that is now sold out and no longer in print.  His work was selected by juror Bill Arning, Curator of the List Visual Arts Center at M.I.T., for inclusion in the Juried Exhibition-in-Print, New American Paintings (Book #41, Midwestern Edition). The Progressive magazine featured a full-page color plate of his work. The first color plate since the magazine discarded the premise many years before of a color ‘art page’ found within each issue of the otherwise black-and-white magazine.

In 2009, Langley was asked to design the cover for the independent Art/Music/Design zine ACHIERPOINTCOM, based in France.  His design spans the front and back cover of the publication which also included a limited edition fold-out poster of his cover artwork.  In 2007, DON’T , an online publication based in London, featured an interview covering Langley’s philosophies on how his life relates to his art along with the techniques and mindset he possesses in creating his work.  This audio interview was accompanied by over 20 images of Langley’s collage work.  His work was also featured on Diesel.com the London based website of Diesel Jeans.  In May of 2008, his work was selected for inclusion in the Third Annual International Poster Art Exhibit in Rome.

Langley’s concentration has also been on connecting art and artists with the public.  While residing in Madison, WI, he was selected for a solo show at the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts, and Letters and was represented by The Wendy Cooper Gallery.  His largest public project in Madison was serving as the primary force behind the development of Madison’s exhibition space and artist’s co-op now recognized as Winnebago Studios.  Prior to Langley’s efforts in 2001, 2046 Winnebago Street (Madison, WI) was a raw warehouse space housing the studios of 20 individual artists.  Through his recognition of the potential the common space possessed, considerable cosmetic efforts, and the installation of gallery lighting, Langley organized the transformation of the common area between studios into one of Madison’s finer exhibit spaces.  He designed the Winnebago Studios logo and sign that now labels the building as well as invitations to Winnebago Studios’ inaugural Open House.  This event provided the public a tour of the newly completed exhibition space along with the opportunity to view the work and studios of artists working there for the first time in the history of the building.

Also while in Madison, Langley was featured in the invitational exhibit A Decade of Art from the Wisconsin Academy Gallery. This exhibit showcased the rich diversity and style of artists who have been selected for solo shows at the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts, and Letters.

In 2006, Langley returned to St Louis, the city of his birth.  In addition to exhibiting extensively, he has participated in art education programs for at-risk-youth.  Langley was asked to design the program cover for the Taste of St Louis in 2006.  In 2007, He was one of eight artists selected to create their own mural on an abandoned building to mark the beginning of development of Chouteau’s Landing, a new arts district in downtown St Louis. In 2010 he created the 20 Portrait Project that provided reasonably priced portraits to 20 individuals in order to finance a trip to Berlin.

Langley has devoted the last seven years working to improve St. Louis’ Cherokee Street neighborhood.  In addition to his numerous public artworks on Cherokee Street, his aesthetic sense and painting abilities have served to beautify more than 20 historic storefronts on the street. His long-running visual display in the storefront windows of 2319 Cherokee was an ambiguous, ever-changing array of art and artifact.  This installation was set up and available for viewing 24 hours a day, 7 days a week for over four consecutive years.  In 2010, he handled the production of stage sets for The Secret Sound Fest which took place in several venues on Cherokee Street.  Langley conceptualized and created 4 of the 7 stage sets.

In addition to his work as a fine artist, Langley continues to introduce the public to the benefits of owning original artwork. Through lectures and purchase incentives to first time art buyers, his greatest goal is to help make art accessible to all and to help break down the barriers that exist between art and the public.

Ron Buechele

ron buechele

Photo by JJ Lane – Be Lovely Photography

 

 

Josh Svoboda

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My inspiration comes from invoked emotion…faith…a break up… struggles, and relieving stress.  I find I am always inspired by artists like David Choe, Franz Kline, Jackson Pollack but mostly from myself…

I look forward to working on more paintings, finding more inspiration, working to mature my technique, all with the hopes and dreams that one day I can share my journey- through art- with others.

Julie Malone


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Influenced by life and living, color theory and digital imagery, her work took on a neo-cubist style and she stamped her unique technique. Her color application is rich and the forms well defined with carving and scratch drawing. She prefers to paint on wood panels and composite surfaces, all of which she hand builds, joins and frames. Occasionally, she will do a series of canvas pieces and also works on paper.

SOHA Gallery was conceived in March of 2011 and opened in June of 2011. A lifelong dream, she has figured out how to balance her career with her dream.

Sukanya Mani

Photo by JJ Lane - Be Lovely Photography

Photo by JJ Lane – Be Lovely Photography

I create multiple series simultaneously because each series feeds off each other and I explore different ideas through different techniques at the same time. Many of my paintings reflect my Indian heritage. The colors, forms and symbols in my paintings celebrate my culture and I marry that with my contemporary life as an immigrant in the United States.

Kyle Heikkila

Photo by JJ Lane - Be Lovely Photography

Photo by JJ Lane – Be Lovely Photography

 

Bob Hartzell

Photo by JJ Lane - Be Lovely Photography

Photo by JJ Lane – Be Lovely Photography

Bob Hartzell is a printmaker and light sculptor, who is active in community arts and education.

Having moved to St. Louis a few years ago, Bob has been active in the local arts community both through teaching and volunteering. He is a graduate of the Regional Arts Council’s Community Arts Training program. In 2011, working with Washington University in conjunction with the Southern Graphic Council’s International Conference in St. Louis, he organized the Lights Along the Cherokee project that helped build a series of twenty seven light towers that marked a variety of venues on the night of the SGC visit to Cherokee Street. In early 2012, he worked with the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts to create and complete a large scale lantern project in conjunction with their Staging Reflections of the Buddha project. Hewas a resident artist at the South Broadway Art Project in south city St. Louis in 2012, and is the owner and chief everything officer of his print-shop alter-ego, Augratin Press.

Nelson Perez

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I love creating whimsical, fun, cartoon style paintings with a contemporary twist. My art is colorful and happy. I love playing with textures and expressing my thoughts and dreams onto canvas. I primarily paint with acrylics, but I have been known to oil it up a bit, and use mix media. I enjoy life, and I try to transcend that feeling through my art. Every time someone tells me that one of my paintings makes them happy or that it reminds them of a good time, I know my message is being received.

A lot of the motivation for my art is from the work I do in the social work field. I work with and get to know people that are dealing with situations that I could not even imagine going up against. To watch them face these issues and still appreciate the gifts in life is inspiring. When I see so many people struggling and suffering every day, but still find reasons to laugh and smile, it makes it hard not to try to find the joy and sometimes sarcasm when painting. I am the creator of Vodka Bacon Studios.

Jason Spencer

Jason Spencer

Photo by Peter Wochniak – ProPhotoSTL

Jason Spencer, aka Killer Napkins, was born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri. After studying fine art at a local college he expanded his creative passions, ranging from illustration, apparel design, sculpture, and painting. By combining the cute and horrific, he has created a body of edgy and unique work.

Abby Birhanu

Photo by JJ Lane - Be Lovely Photography

Photo by JJ Lane – Be Lovely Photography

Abigail (Abby) Birhanu is an artist and art teacher currently living in St. Louis, Missouri.  She moved to the United States at the age of nine from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.  She  received a BFA in Art Education from the University of Missouri-St. Louis in 2006 and is currently working on a master’s degree from Webster University in Applied Education Psychology.

Today, Abby continues to make art while teaching. She has prospects of sharing her work with her native country and getting involved in programs in which the arts are used as an enrichment tool to help develop communities both in the United States and abroad.

Jenny Murphy

Jenny Murphy

Photo by JJ Lane – Be Lovely Photography

Jenny Murphy is the Founder and Executive Director of Perennial. Amazed and inspired by the objects she finds discarded on the side of the road, Jenny began working on this project as a way to create a current against our consumer culture that leads to such waste. She hopes that through Perennial, people can discover the easy ways they can reuse, save money, and reengage with the objects around them. She is an artist and educator who holds a BFA with a focus in sculpture from The Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Art at Washington University in St. Louis.

Sophia Dalpiaz-Brown

Photo by Peter Wochniak - ProPhotoSTL

Photo by Peter Wochniak – ProPhotoSTL

 

Myles Keough

Photo by JJ Lane - Be Lovely Photography

Photo by JJ Lane – Be Lovely Photography

Myles Keough creates worlds within canvas. Using spray enamel reacting to chemicals he creates a foundation untouched by brush strokes. These foundations defy scale, looking to some as atmospheric and to others microscopic. Within these foundations, Keough introduces architectural elements creating cities complete with names and populations. These cities do not represent actual cities you may have visited, rather a city that only exists within the canvas. Recently the inner working of the cities are being explored; the transportation, economy, people and landmarks.

Ashli England

Photo by JJ Lane - Be Lovely Photography

Photo by JJ Lane – Be Lovely Photography

I use color as therapy , in what ever form it comes.

I prefer the viewer to observe my work in silence and separate their self from mind, let the brain go empty and art the art flow through …then the true intention of my work is revealed.

Zoe Nicholson

Photo by JJ Lane - Be Lovely Photography

Photo by JJ Lane – Be Lovely Photography

Ash Forrest

Photo by JJ Lane - Be Lovely Photography

Photo by JJ Lane – Be Lovely Photography

Vesna Delevska

Vesna Delevska

Photo by Peter Wochniak – ProPhotoSTL

Colors, shapes, nature, form, beauty, are all elements of my personal language through which I can express feelings that I cannot describe through words. I use painting as a most intimate form of communication.
The more I paint the closer I come to who I am.

 

Tim Furlow

Photo By Jen Sarti Photography

Photo By Jen Sarti Photography

Art is everywhere you look. For me, it’s every waking moment, and a constant search. My approach to painting is to create a blend of pop art, street art, and punk ‘zine art from the 1970s-80s. All of my paintings are drawn by hand, and when possible, photography is all original. No stencils are used in any piece.

Evelyn Astegno

Photo by Peter Wochniak - Pro Photo STL

Photo by Peter Wochniak – Pro Photo STL

Since I was able to hold a pencil, drawing and, later, painting have been the core of my interests, as a way to express myself and as my sense and purpose in life. My production ranges from portraits to other works to my most personal paintings.

While human figures and natural elements are basically treated realistically, perspective and architectural elements become often distorted, as we humans see reality from singular points of view. I also tend to use allegories (living symbols), in accordance to collective archetypes, as part of my imagery. I then make both my intellect and intuition work together into the elaboration of one single composition. That’s why my personal paintings can be seen as thoughts translated into images. They belong to a sort of Magic Realism where realistic representation seems immersed in an atmosphere silent and timeless.

Jeff Kapfer

Photo by JJ Lane - Be Lovely Photography

Photo by JJ Lane – Be Lovely Photography

Jeff Kapfer earned a BFA from Webster University with an emphasis in graphic design. He combines his graphic design influence with his childhood obsession with birds to create vibrant light-hearted paintings inspired by friends, family and everyday life. His work has been shown throughout St. Louis including Houska Gallery, Marbles Gallery, and PHD Gallery.

Megan Rieke

Megan Rieke

Photo by Peter Wochniak – ProPhotoSTL

I am a storyteller telling stories with a paintbrush. The subject matter of my paintings revolve around the seemingly mundane aspects of a blue collar Midwestern life. I am interested in delving into these environments and the objects within because, through these details, our stories evolve from ordinary to extraordinary.

Moreover, by illuminating the prosaic factions of our lives, the observer is given an insight into each other’s idiosyncrasies through which an understanding and a stronger connection with one another is formed. It is only through empathy that we can morph our plot lines into a beautiful, collective, revolution.

I paint in an impressionistic realism style with acrylics and charcoals.  Visible brushstrokes and distinguishable errors create a sense of struggle.  This struggle is the protagonist in all my works and is meant to enhance the themes of my paintings. Each piece contains failures, doubt, and frustration which then twist and transform into success, belief, and jubilation.

Terri Willits

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Drawing on a number of motivators, I am currently working predominantly in mixed media with encaustics. My work meshes the ancient technique of encaustic with varied objects and figures to create images that I find strikingly lyrical, both emotionally and intellectually.

I incorporate drawing, photography, printmaking and found objects into my work without extensive preplanning or consideration for the process itself. While I try to work with the highest quality materials, little thought of the finished work is given prior to beginning a project. I have learned to expect changing environments in my life and find that this perspective translates well when paying tribute to process and creation.

 

Philly Alex Johnmeyer

 

Philly Alex Johnmeyer

“The paintings I create are a vibrant translation of my world, and I love to incorporate symbolism into the colors and subject matters I choose. Art is a way to express the themes that define my life, the emotions I want to capture and share. In my work, I explore the ideas of love, pain, death, religion, childhood, sexuality, and gender.

I have been showing my work in juried group exhibitions in local St. Louis galleries the past few years, and truly enjoy being involved in the St. Louis art scene. I continue to act as an art installation volunteer for MySlart.org under the leadership of Jenny Churchill, for their monthly shows at The Old Orchard Gallery in Webster Groves.”

Zack Smithey

Zack Smithey

Photo by JJ Lane – Be Lovely Photography

 

Though Zack has lived a life of diversity there has always been one constant, art. Smithey claims that he has been an artist/creator since he was a toddler when he first learned to hold a mark-making tool and assemble sculptures from mud, sticks and toys. Growing up he played many sports including baseball, soccer, basketball, football, wrestling and boxing.  He also had a short stint as a professional armwrestler winning a state championship in 2004. But, he was more than just a “jock”. He played the viola for 8 years and was in various symphonies and orchestras. He has many inventions and received his first patent as a senior in high school. He has a BFA in Studio Art and a Master’s in Education. As an adult, Smithey has had an array of various jobs; he worked as a landscape designer building retaining walls for 10 years, he was a bouncer for 3 years, he’s rehabbed/rented/flipped several houses, taught high school art for 7 years, painted the sets at the MUNY for 5 years, day-traded on the stock market for 2 years, and currently owns a prominent restaurant in St. Charles, Miss Aimee B’s tea room and gallery.  Zack has had over 60 solo shows and group shows, has done art/film work for Lincoln Center in NYC, was commissioned to do Album art for a band in Brooklyn, and has been published in the New Yorker, StreetScapes, St. Louis Homes & Lifestyles, Uptown Magazine and St. Charles Magazine. Smithey’s work is in numerous private and public collections.

Theresa Hopkins

theresa hopkins

Photo by JJ Lane – Be Lovely Photography

 

 

JT Walls

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Local St. Louis artist. Painter, illustrator, print maker.

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Class Policies

Please LABEL all items such as lunch boxes, backpacks, etc., clearly with your student’s name. We have a lost and found bucket for misplaced items. Please check it daily as items left after class will be donated or discarded. Please pack a REUSABLE WATER BOTTLE for your student DAILY. Artscope always has water for students to refill their water bottle. We do not have cups and strongly encourage reusable containers to minimize environmental impact. Electronic devices are not allowed. Please do not send iPods, cell phones, video games, or other electronic toys to camp. Artscope is peanut and tree nut free. Please do not send foodstuffs containing peanuts/peanut butter or tree nuts (almonds, pecans, walnuts, pistachios, pine nuts, etc.) with your student. Many students and staff members have allergies that result in reactions simply from being touched by others who have handled nut/peanut products. Seed products such as sunflower seeds, sesame seeds, tahini, sunflower seed butter, etc. are fine. All medications (RX or over-the-counter) MUST be checked in / out daily with the Executive Director or class instructor. Do not send medications with your child in their lunchbox/backpack. Medications should be in a ziploc back clearly marked with your student’s name. Please fill out and sign the Medication Authorization form available in the office/from the camp director. Health information/regular medications should also be listed on your camp registration form. If you need to update your form, please let the office staff know.

Pickup/Dropoff/Visits Policy

Please be aware that students must start arriving within fifteen minutes of class start time. Please also be prompt in picking up your student. Parents are always welcome to visit their students, but we ask that you schedule your visit with the camp director in advance as to not disrupt camp programming. ALL parents and visitors must sign in / out with the office staff upon arrival/departure. Due to the public nature of our facility (in the park), Artscope staff maintains an acute awareness of all persons in our area to ensure the safety of all. If someone other than persons authorized on your class registration form will be picking up your student, we MUST have this IN WRITING prior to pick up. Anyone picking up a student not recognized by camp staff as an authorized parent/guardian will be required to show ID. Please advise us of any child custody arrangements/restraining orders and who may pick up and/or visit your students PRIOR to the first day of camp.

Payment/Refund/Cancellation/Session Transfer Policy

All balances are due THREE WEEKS prior to the start of class. Any registrations within three weeks of class must be paid in full. We are only able to issue refunds or credits for cancellations received three weeks prior to the start of your camp week or class session, less a $30 administrative fee. A $15 administrative fee will be charged for EACH transfer transaction to change sessions (based on availability). The non-refundable fee applies to each individual class with no exceptions. We do not offer any refunds or credits for missed classes. In the event that enrollment does not reach the required number for a particular class or camp, or circumstances beyond Artscope’s control arise, Artscope reserves the right to cancel the class or camp. You will be notified and we will be happy to help you find a suitable replacement. If no replacement is available, Artscope will refund your tuition payment in full.

Returned Payment Policy

It is Artscope’s policy to charge a $30 processing fee for ANY returned payment (check/credit card/online transaction). Those whose payments are returned may lose the privilege to pay via check/cc/online and/or deposit payment plan.

Medical Withdrawals/Emergencies

Artscope offers no refunds or credits for withdrawals after the withdrawal deadline except for documented medical conditions for the attendee. You must submit a withdrawal request and documentation on physician’s letterhead stating the medical condition as to why the attendee must withdraw. Medical withdrawals must be submitted prior to the first day of camp (business days only). Tuition will be credited to your account or refunded at Artscope’s discretion less $30 administrative fee.

Building Closures/Weather

If severe weather, a power outage, or other unforeseen circumstances necessitate the closing of Artscope's programs, Artscope is not responsible for providing a makeup session, credit or refund. Artscope provides information about closures via email, www.artscopestl.org and our Facebook page. You may also email info@artscopestl.org if you have questions regarding closure. Please note that the phone may or may not be answered if the facility is closed.

Dismissal Policy

Artscope is committed to providing a safe, high quality educational experience to all participants. To ensure a quality experience, Artscope reserves the right to dismiss any participant for any reason without refund.
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Camp Policies

Please LABEL all items such as lunch boxes, backpacks, sunscreen, and extra clothing / swimsuits / towels clearly with your camper’s name. We have a lost and found bucket for misplaced items. Please check it daily as items left after camp will be donated or discarded. Please pack a REUSABLE WATER BOTTLE for your camper(s) DAILY. Artscope always has water for campers to refill their water bottle. We do not have cups and strongly encourage reusable containers to minimize environmental impact. WE GET MESSY and, weather permitting, we play outside! We get really messy both indoors and out, and if it is warm, maybe even wet! Please send your camper(s) in clothing and shoes suitable for ACTIVE outdoor activities and messy creative play. Campers should bring a change of clothing as well as sunscreen and bug spray or winter outerwear (hats, gloves, coats, winter footwear) as applicable with your camper daily. Electronic devices are not allowed. Please do not send iPods, cell phones, video games, or other electronic toys to camp. Artscope is peanut and tree nut free. Please do not send foodstuffs containing peanuts/peanut butter or tree nuts (almonds, pecans, walnuts, pistachios, pine nuts, etc.) with your camper. Many campers as well as our staff have allergies that result in reactions simply from being touched by others who have handled nut/peanut products. Seed products such as sunflower seeds, sesame seeds, tahini, sunflower seed butter, etc. are fine. All medications (RX or over-the-counter) MUST be checked in / out daily with the camp director. Do not send medications with your child in their lunchbox/backpack. Medications should be in a ziploc back clearly marked with your camper’s name. Please fill out and sign the Medication Authorization form available in the office/from the camp director. Health information/regular medications should also be listed on your camp registration form. If you need to update your form, please let the office staff know.

Pickup/Dropoff/Visits Policy

Camp is from 9AM to 3PM. Please be aware that campers arriving before 8:55AM will be charged for AM extended care. Please also be prompt in picking up your camper. Campers picked up after 3:05 PM will be charged for PM extended care. Parents are always welcome to visit their camper(s), but we ask that you schedule your visit with the camp director in advance as to not disrupt camp programming. ALL parents and visitors must sign in / out with the office staff upon arrival/departure. Due to the public nature of our facility (in the park), camp staff maintains an acute awareness of all persons in our area to insure the safety of all. Extended care must be pre-scheduled in advance to insure proper staff-student ratios. After care campers not picked up by 6PM will be charged $1 per minute. If someone other than persons authorized on your camp registration form will be picking up your camper, we MUST have this IN WRITING prior to pick up. Anyone picking up a camper not recognized by camp staff as an authorized parent/guardian will be required to show ID. Please advise us of any child custody arrangements/restraining orders and who may pick up and/or visit your camper(s) PRIOR to the first day of camp.

Payment/Refund/Cancellation/Session Transfer Policy

All balances are due THREE WEEKS prior to the start of camp. Any registrations within three weeks of camp must be paid in full. Balances not paid in full by deadline may result in loss of deposit and reserved spot for camp. We are only able to issue refunds or credits for cancellations received three weeks prior to the start of your camp week or class session, less a $30 administrative fee. A $15 administrative fee will be charged for EACH transfer transaction to change sessions (based on availability). EACH camp week/class session is treated as a separate transaction. The non-refundable fee applies to each transaction with no exceptions. We do not offer any refunds or credits for missed classes/camps. In the event that enrollment does not reach the required number for a particular class or camp, or circumstances beyond Artscope’s control arise, Artscope reserves the right to cancel the class or camp. You will be notified and we will be happy to help you find a suitable replacement. If no replacement is available, Artscope will refund your tuition payment in full.

Returned Payment Policy

It is Artscope’s policy to charge a $30 processing fee for ANY returned payment (check/credit card/online transaction). Those whose payments are returned may lose the privilege to pay via check/cc/online and/or deposit payment plan.

Medical Withdrawals/Emergencies

Artscope offers no refunds or credits for withdrawals after the withdrawal deadline except for documented medical conditions for the attendee. You must submit a withdrawal request and documentation on physician’s letterhead stating the medical condition as to why the attendee must withdraw. Medical withdrawals must be submitted prior to the first day of camp (business days only). Tuition will be credited to your account or refunded at Artscope’s discretion less $30 administrative fee.

Building Closures/Weather

If severe weather, a power outage, or other unforeseen circumstances necessitate the closing of Artscope programs, Artscope is not responsible for providing a makeup session, credit or refund. Artscope provides information about closures via email, www.artscopestl.org and our Facebook page. You may also email info@artscopestl.org if you have questions regarding closure. Please note that the phone may or may not be answered if the facility is closed.

Dismissal Policy

Artscope is committed to providing a safe, high quality educational experience to all participants. To ensure a quality experience, Artscope reserves the right to dismiss any participant for any reason without refund.

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